This is a body positive blog!

All the things I like or find interesting. I believe that every person deserves to be treated with respect regardless or their size, sex, gender, race or ability.

I also enjoy novels, graphic novels/comics, movies, throwbacks from the 80's and (1980 and 1880) fabulousness and many things nerdy.


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Aug 16, 2014
@ 3:08 pm
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3,856 notes

humansofnewyork:

"One day I drove into the city to buy goods for my shop. I repaired antennas and satellite dishes, so I needed some replacement parts. But on the road there was a checkpoint for the Syrian government, and two soldiers came up to my car. They began to argue with each other. ‘Let’s take him,’ said one of them. 'Let him go,' said the other. And they went back and forth, and back and forth. But finally the first man won the argument, and they took me out of my car, put a blindfold on me, and took me to jail. When I got to the jail, they began beating me with a cord. They asked me if I supported the rebels. I kept saying 'No,' but they kept beating me. They took off all my clothes. They said: 'We are going to whip you 35 times, and if you say 'ouch,' we will start from the beginning. They whipped me and kicked me and broke 3 of my ribs. They said: ‘Tell us how many soldiers you’ve killed.’ I said: ‘None.’They said: ‘Tell us how many soldiers!”I said: ‘None. I haven’t killed anyone.’But they kept beating me and they ripped off my toenails and I screamed: ‘Eleven! Eleven! I killed eleven soldiers!’ So they put me into prison. But I never killed any soldiers. I never fought anyone. I’m a good person. I have a very sweet heart. You believe me when I tell you this, don’t you?”(Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan)

humansofnewyork:

"One day I drove into the city to buy goods for my shop. I repaired antennas and satellite dishes, so I needed some replacement parts. But on the road there was a checkpoint for the Syrian government, and two soldiers came up to my car. They began to argue with each other. ‘Let’s take him,’ said one of them. 
'Let him go,' said the other. And they went back and forth, and back and forth. But finally the first man won the argument, and they took me out of my car, put a blindfold on me, and took me to jail. When I got to the jail, they began beating me with a cord. They asked me if I supported the rebels. I kept saying 'No,' but they kept beating me. They took off all my clothes. They said: 'We are going to whip you 35 times, and if you say 'ouch,' we will start from the beginning. They whipped me and kicked me and broke 3 of my ribs. 
They said: ‘Tell us how many soldiers you’ve killed.’ 
I said: ‘None.’
They said: ‘Tell us how many soldiers!”
I said: ‘None. I haven’t killed anyone.’
But they kept beating me and they ripped off my toenails and I screamed: ‘Eleven! Eleven! I killed eleven soldiers!’ So they put me into prison. But I never killed any soldiers. I never fought anyone. I’m a good person. I have a very sweet heart. You believe me when I tell you this, don’t you?”
(Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan)


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Aug 16, 2014
@ 2:24 pm
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4,290 notes

redlipsandpolkadotss:

fromthecornersofthecurve:

That time I was in The Times.I love how they chose to use this quote - When I first met Dan I truly thought that he couldn’t fancy me because I was fat. I didn’t believe that he could have simply just found me attractive. Now I know better. To other fat babes - You are not a fetish you are deserving of love, you can be attractive and sexy and beautiful and handsome, intelligent men can love you not because of your size but because of you.

things i needed to hear

redlipsandpolkadotss:

fromthecornersofthecurve:

That time I was in The Times.

I love how they chose to use this quote - When I first met Dan I truly thought that he couldn’t fancy me because I was fat. I didn’t believe that he could have simply just found me attractive. Now I know better. To other fat babes - You are not a fetish you are deserving of love, you can be attractive and sexy and beautiful and handsome, intelligent men can love you not because of your size but because of you.

things i needed to hear

(via janayiscool)


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Aug 16, 2014
@ 1:40 pm
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70,867 notes

When The Media Treats White Suspects And Killers Better Than Black Victicms.

curvesincolor:

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via The Huffington Post.

(via my-little-underground)


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Aug 16, 2014
@ 12:56 pm
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1,499 notes

The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.

— Scott Woods  (via moonghst)

(Source: nyctaeus, via beeonkah)


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Aug 16, 2014
@ 12:12 pm
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2,776 notes

howtobeafuckinglady:

lordbape:

If someone working at Chipotle rung up the order you asked for correctly would you be exclaiming “SEE THERE ARE GOOD CHIPOTLE WORKERS” no you’d be like “yeah that is.. your job..” like

!!!

YOU DON’T GET A PAT THE BACK FOR DOING SHIT YOU SUPPOSE TO BE DOING 

(via my-little-underground)


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Aug 16, 2014
@ 11:28 am
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3,562 notes

toffany:

Revisiting a beautiful girl I saw on a bus stop a few years ago. I’ll be making artwork to celebrate the beauty of black youth - Blackness isn’t dangerous or ugly, and this is how I experience and see blackness todayRIP Michael Brown

toffany:

Revisiting a beautiful girl I saw on a bus stop a few years ago. I’ll be making artwork to celebrate the beauty of black youth - Blackness isn’t dangerous or ugly, and this is how I experience and see blackness today

RIP Michael Brown

(via ormessociety)


Photoset

Aug 16, 2014
@ 10:44 am
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57,127 notes

(Source: myexternalmemory, via my-little-underground)


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Aug 15, 2014
@ 8:16 pm
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58,639 notes

my-little-underground:

cindimayweathersson:

memewhore:

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She cussed out the governor!
I live!

This woman is a Bad Ass!


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Aug 15, 2014
@ 7:32 pm
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89 notes

Guest Post: “Some of My Best Friends are Straight”: Boston Comic Con’s Queer Comics Panel

dcwomenkickingass:

Note: One of my favorite guest posters (and fellow Bostonian) Jon E. Christianson is back with a look at the Queer Comics panel from this past weekend’s BCC.

The (convention) halls were alive with the sights of lines this past weekend in Boston’s Seaport World Trade Center. Comic book creators had winding lines. Celebrity panel lines were an ouroboric nightmare.

Boston Comic Con had all the right lines in all the expected places, except for one panel. BCC’s first annual Queer Comics panel, tucked away in a room for maybe one hundred people, boasted a line the convention was not prepared for. It snaked through hallways, around corners, and eventually doubled upon itself.

People were turned away at the door. Hosted by journalist Brigid Alverson, the panel featured four panelists: writer/artist Tana Ford (Duck, New Warriors), writer Jennie Wood (Flutter, A Boy Like Me), podcaster and writer Amber Love  (podcast Vodka O’Clock, Holyoak), and Geeks OUT! president and co-founder Joey Stern.

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From left to right, Tana Ford, Jennie Wood, Amber Love, Joey Stern. Photo by Ashley Hansberry

Alverson offered a brief overview of queer comics history, noting that societal changes and self-publishing have contributed to the genre’s success.

“What queer works have resonated with you?” Alverson asked the panel.

Read More


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Aug 15, 2014
@ 6:48 pm
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47,865 notes

afrobluess:

The Howard alumni who was shot in the head made a speedy recovery and she was able to tell her side of the story. The police said that it was a drive by conducted by a group of black men and that it was fatal. They didn’t expect her to survive and talk.

(via my-little-underground)